Saturday, December 12, 2009

Hall of Fame nominees for 2010 are announced

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Batting Stats
Rk
YoB
%vote
HOFm
HOFs
Yrs
G
AB
1
Andre Dawson
9th
67.0%
118
44
21
2627
9927
2
Bert Blyleven
12th
62.7%
120
50
22
218
451
3
Harold Baines
4th
5.9%
66
44
22
2830
9908
4
Lee Smith
8th
44.5%
135
13
18
770
64
5
Jack Morris
11th
44.0%
122
39
18
23
1
6
Tim Raines
3rd
22.6%
90
47
23
2502
8872
7
Mark McGwire
4th
21.9%
170
42
16
1874
6187
8
Alan Trammell
9th
17.4%
118
40
20
2293
8288
9
Dave Parker
14th
15.0%
124
42
19
2466
9358
10
Don Mattingly
10th
11.9%
134
34
14
1785
7003
11
Dale Murphy
12th
11.5%
116
34
18
2180
7960
12
Roberto Alomar
1st
194
57
17
2379
9073
13
Edgar Martinez
1st
132
50
18
2055
7213
14
Barry Larkin
1st
118
47
19
2180
7937
15
Andres Galarraga
1st
114
35
19
2257
8096
16
Fred McGriff
1st
100
48
19
2460
8757
17
Mike Jackson
1st
52
11
17
374
28
18
Ellis Burks
1st
50
42
18
2000
7232
19
Pat Hentgen
1st
37
12
14
42
84
20
Robin Ventura
1st
32
30
16
2079
7064
21
Kevin Appier
1st
32
24
16
41
83
22
Eric Karros
1st
30
17
14
1755
6441
23
Ray Lankford
1st
22
26
14
1701
5747
24
Shane Reynolds
1st
18
12
13
296
546
25
David Segui
1st
15
16
15
1456
4847
26
Todd Zeile
1st
14
27
16
2158
7573
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/12/2009.



Here's the nominees for the 2010 Hall of Fame to be voted on by the BBWAA (Baseball Writers Association of America) in January. The list is impressive this year with alot of 1st time nominees. Some of the nominees may come as a surprise, and some names are just assured to making it into the Hall of Fame. The process is not easy though here is the finer points of making it into the Hall of Fame:



This is from Wikipedia on the selection and voting process:


Players are currently inducted into the Hall of Fame through election by either the Baseball Writers Association of America (or BBWAA), or the Veterans Committee,[9] which is now composed of living Hall of Famers; additional special committees, some including recipients of the two major awards, are also regularly formed to make selections. Five years after retirement, any player with 10 years of major league experience who passes a screening committee (which removes from consideration players of clearly lesser qualification) is eligible to be elected by BBWAA members with 10 years' membership or more. From a final ballot typically including 25–40 candidates, each writer may vote for up to 10 players; until the late 1950s, voters were advised to cast votes for the maximum 10 candidates. Any player named on 75% or more of all ballots cast is elected. A player who is named on fewer than 5% of ballots is dropped from future elections. In some instances, the screening committee had restored their names to later ballots, but in the mid-1990s, dropped players were made permanently ineligible for Hall of Fame consideration, even by the Veterans Committee. A 2001 change in the election procedures restored the eligibility of these dropped players; while their names will not appear on future BBWAA ballots, they may be considered by the Veterans Committee.


Under special circumstances, certain players may be deemed eligible for induction even though they have not met all requirements. This resulted in the induction of Addie Joss, who was elected in 1978 despite only playing in nine seasons due to his death from meningitis. Additionally, if an otherwise eligible player dies before his fifth year of retirement, then that player may be placed on the ballot at the first election at least six months after his death. Roberto Clemente's induction in 1973 set the precedent when the writers chose to put him up for consideration after his death on New Year's Eve, 1972.
Lineup for Yesterday
Z is for Zenith
The summit of fame.
These men are up there.
These men are the game.

— Ogden NashSportmagazine (January 1949)[10]
The five-year waiting period was established in 1954 after an evolutionary process. In 1936 all players were eligible, including active ones. From the 1937 election until the 1945 election, there was no waiting period, so any retired player was eligible, but writers were discouraged from voting for current major leaguers. Since there was no formal rule preventing a writer from casting a ballot for an active player, the scribes did not always comply with the informal guideline; Joe DiMaggio received a vote in 1945, for example. From the 1946 election until the 1954 election, an official one-year waiting period was in effect. (DiMaggio, for example, retired after the 1951 season and was first eligible in the 1953 election.) The modern rule establishing a wait of five years was passed in 1954, although an exception was made for Joe DiMaggio because of his high level of previous support, thus permitting him to be elected within four years of his retirement. Contrary to popular belief, no formal exception was made for Lou Gehrig, other than to hold a special one-man election for him. There was no waiting period at that time and Gehrig met all other qualifications, so he would have been eligible for the next regular election after he retired during the 1939 season, but the BBWAA decided to hold a special election at the 1939 Winter Meetings in Cincinnati, specifically to elect Gehrig (most likely because it was known that he was terminally ill, making it uncertain that he would live long enough to see another election). Nobody else was on that ballot, and the numerical results have never been made public. Since no elections were held in 1940 or 1941, the special election permitted Gehrig to enter the Hall while still alive.
If a player fails to be elected by the BBWAA within 20 years of his retirement from active play, he may be selected by the Veterans Committee, which now holds elections for players only for induction in odd-numbered years. However, only players whose careers began in 1943 or later will be eligible for election by the main Veterans Committee, in accordance with changes to the voting process for that body instituted in July 2007. These changes also established three separate committees to select other figures:
  • One committee votes on managers and umpires for induction in every even-numbered year. The first vote by this committee was conducted in 2007 for induction in 2008.
  • One committee votes on executives and builders for induction in every even-numbered year. This committee also conducted its first vote in 2007 for induction in 2008.
  • One committee will vote every five years on players whose careers began in 1942 or earlier. It conducted its first vote as part of the election process for induction in 2009.






1 comment:

  1. Blyleven should get in for his nickname alone - Bert "Be Home" Blyleven. A classic.

    ReplyDelete